Honda drivers in the U.S. who use the auto firm’s “cloud-based connected car system” can now get their Amazon parcels delivered to the trunk of their car.

In a statement earlier this week, Honda said that drivers with a subscription to the HondaLink Remote Services system and a compatible vehicle would be able to use the Key by Amazon app to select an “in-car” delivery option.

On the day of delivery, users of the service must park within two blocks of a selected delivery address. When it’s confirmed that the car is in range of the address, a delivery driver will use its GPS location to determine the exact position.

The driver will then scan the package before sending a request for the vehicle to be unlocked so it can be dropped off. The vehicle is then re-locked and the customer is sent a notification to confirm the delivery was made and that their vehicle is secured. Customers need an Amazon Prime subscription to use the service, which is currently available in a select number of cities and surrounding areas. 

Honda is the latest car company to utilize the system. Others include GMC and Volvo. The cars have to be 2015 models or newer and need connected service systems.

More broadly, innovation is transforming the way goods and services are delivered. Earlier this month, U.K. supermarket Waitrose announced it would be expanding the trial of its “While You’re Away” delivery service.

Yale smart-lock technology gives Waitrose delivery drivers access to a customer’s home. The customer sets a temporary access code for their lock, which is sent to Waitrose through a secure app.

This code is in turn sent to a driver’s device for the time slot the customer has booked their delivery for and deleted when the delivery is made.

The driver packs refrigerated and frozen goods away and leaves other items on the kitchen counter, or wherever the customer has asked them to be left. A chest-cam worn by the driver records the delivery, with customers able to view the video upon request.



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